Tied to a tree

When I go travelling there,

I see what I see,

When I look at a tree,

the minutes extend one another

to quarter or half an hour,

before I move on to the next,

rewriting the logical words,

for each of the species,

with all those thalli,

on the surface of bark,

where I look with a lens,

and a spark.

Howard Fox,

14/15 ix 2015

Caribbean Literary Salon Blog II

What (unfinished)

Relax, take it easy, calm your mind, not so fast.

Time is a healer, on your day off.

Isolation is unneccessary, censure is intolerable.

Talk in friendliness about anything,

compose something, talk it out loud,

for your sanity demands it,

connect with other souls, talk about modernity.

Listless in the heat, brain fry complete

deep breath, take it easy,

calm down, not so fast.

Take a walk to a tree,

use your eyes for an exercise

to see what is a twig,

develop the vocabulary to communicate

about an entity external to me,

keep going, screening with your eyes

until you have seen something you did

not know exists, now

take your time, really take it easy,

look at nature, calm, with your mind.

Recreation in nature is an inquisitive enqiry,

what is it like ?

Use your mind to describe this entity,

maybe do a dissection, or a drawing, or a painting,

or a photo, if you are impatient.

Make an image in your mind to communicate with the future

so that we can speak of the same entity,

in the same language, in the same words,

to some other soul, for we are all kindred.

Minister some spiritual kinship, by mentoring

this exercise in clarity, calm from the anxieties

of a distressed mind, a bit of visual yoga.

All you need is a tree, standing nose to a low branch,

shortsighteness helps, and tropical sunlight, to give good acuity,

for to see what is this entity, before me.

I am not the first to need something external,

to drive my tortured concerns away, but perhaps

with the spark of curiosity, looking is something my eyes can do

mindlessly, contribute kinship with that entity,

that needs a bit of dew, and respect too.

Calm the mind from its anxieties

is the exercise here, a diversion perhaps

if it works perhaps, perhaps, perhaps

the scales on the eyes of your perception,

will need a gentle rub, why torture your mind,

with intolerable situations, take a deep breath

and let it all go, keep your eyes open, and

release yourself from the tyrrany of why.

Why, for you have now delved

into the torture of what !

(c) Howard Fox, June 2013

Views: 43

Tags: poetry, tree, visual, yoga

Comment by Howard Fox on June 7, 2013 at 9:16am

In composing this piece as a reaction to Roger Carter’s Why (unfinished), I am conscious of writing the same poem, again and again, on the Caribbean Literary Salon site, with different words. Such a preoccupation it has been warned against, and is common among those who express ideas in lyrical and poetic forms. My concern with the cognitive method of botany is pervasive and a difficult theme to escape from and a lot more needs to be written on this theme. I am also drawing on a conversation with a retired bryologist, Donal Synnott, over the use of the words tyrrany and torture – in botany, the need to provide polite society with scientific names for plants could be considered a tyranny or torture, formalised in binomial nomenclature by Carl Linnaeus, over 250 years ago. The predictive nature of the species and generic hypotheses of science is profound and a pleasure to use. Now we are in the midst of a phase of accommodating genetic information in the botanical synthesis to the detriment of a classical botanical education in morphology or form. In providing this stimulus to Caribbean botany, I trust this Salon will appreciate how to assimilate plants into their national cultures, and this will encourage a few who on the fringes of a botanical enlightement, might take cognitive steps in their observation methods to improve their perception for and respect for plants, that possess a subversive lack of an obvious utilitarian role in the society we live.

Caribbean Literary Salon Blog I

The ways are clear for us to walk

up the vales of L’Ivrogne

to tarry by a fencepost

while tethered cattle look on

the heat, the flies, the brilliance

of the white Ochrolechia thallus

sorediate in places, something quite routine

a form from the Caribik, is what we have seen

Carefully collected, numbered 29185

preserved in East Lansing for everyone

A particular piece of Soufriere that catches the noonday sun

the fencepost crumbled fifty years along

by the Cacao orchard on the way to Fond Doux.

The forms that surround us, we do really see,

we have to set a syllabus to educate us in them

the form is just once off, not another thallus within arms reach

a white mysterious crustose Ochrolechia of the Caribik

for our curiosity. The concept is mid century and was Lecanora before.

Context is supplied in Cuba by Wright or Guadeloupe by Duss

that is what Vainio wrote in 1915 I hope, but this hypothesis

must be read again, revise up on the history his worry said

Looking back, maybe someone in future will see how to group this,

another, maybe three, in a logic framework that we can all use

if we can perceive the soufrieriness of thee

For hail Brodo, it is a white sorediate crust, only one can you be

that a whiff of creativity is appropriate to solve the mystery.

Comment by Althea Romeo-Mark on March 25, 2013 at 6:35am

Delete Comment

Interesting poem. I do feel like I am on a journey with you, a little exploration of the natural environment to see what it has to offer us and tell us.  It takes us on a botanical and historical journey, and yet manages to have some rhythm and rhyme. I think it could be edited to give it more shape and form.  Break some of the longer lines, but do not break the rhythm.

Comment by Anthony RICHARDS on December 28, 2012 at 7:35pm
Delete Comment

Ok. I admit that you made me look!

I “googled” Okrolechia.

Regards, and thanks for all the assistance, this year.

Have a great New Year

Tony